Skip to content

Wellness Hospitality: Health and Wellbeing

10th April 2020
Jeju Parnas Hotel – Wellness Hospitality on Jeju Island
Wellness Hospitality: Health and Wellbeing

According to The Global Wellness Institute, Asia Pacific is the third largest global market for wellness tourism and is growing at the fastest rate of any market. Worth US $136.7 bn in 2017, this area of tourism is projected to be valued at US $251.6 bn by 2022. In South Korea, the 16th largest wellness tourism destination in the world, 19.6 million wellness trips were made and the expenditure on wellness tourism was US $7.2 billion in 2017. Wellness tourism is expected to continue its growth momentum in this part of the world. For many people in Asia who live and work in some of the busiest and most polluted cities in the world, concern about the health effects of the pressured urban environment including poor air quality, is paramount. Holidays and short trips can become an opportunity for a detox away from the city and to reset wellbeing. This can be in the form of connecting with nature by hiking through forests or spending time on a beach but also by staying in a hotel that nurtures wellness in every element of its design.

Designing for this expanding leisure market

The wellness tourism market includes two types of travellers: primary wellness travellers, who are motivated by wellness to take a trip or choose their destination based on its wellness offerings (e.g., someone visiting a wellness resort or participating in a yoga retreat); and secondary wellness travellers, who seek to maintain wellness or engage in wellness activities during any kind of travel (e.g. someone who visits a gym, gets a massage, or prioritises healthy food when they take a trip).

Wellness tourism is particularly profitable. The international wellness tourists to Korea spend 36% more and domestic wellness tourists spend 37% more than on a standard trip.

Heta’s Jeju Parnas wellness hotel development has been designed to appeal to both primary and secondary wellness travellers. We have prioritised the wellbeing of visitors in the design of all interior and exterior areas of the hotel, using our wellness principles to guide the thinking about a guest’s physical, mental and aesthetic wellbeing.

From 2015 to 2017 the wellness tourism market grew from $563bn to $639bn, or 6.5% annually – more than twice as fast as the growth of tourism overall, according to the Global Wellness Institute. By 2022, GWI predicts the market will reach a whopping $919bn – representing 18% of all global tourism – with well over a billion individual wellness trips to take place around the globe.

bridge garden

Connecting with nature has been a key part in the planning of all areas to create an uplifting sense of natural calm throughout the resort. This includes incorporating materials, colours and textures from the local environment to support aesthetic and mental wellbeing. The development uses Biophilic design and has natural elements woven throughout the grounds and interiors. There is a healing garden and spaces in the landscape created for mindfulness and quiet spaces to reflect, sunrise and sunset yoga on the grass overlooking the ocean as well as an area for storytelling, cultural performances and stargazing.

The environment surrounding the hotel will be equipped with air quality, temperature and humidity sensors. The app is able to show how the air quality around the hotel varies through a map and AR interface. Trees and surrounding foliage have LED sensors that visually indicate the air quality and ‘happiness’ of the plants.

The interiors focus on wellness

The concept for the lobby is of a clear uncluttered space that capitalises on the awesome roof light. This space will feature simple comfortable sofas in informal seating configurations and sympathetic lighting schemes. We have designed the rooms and suites to have the feel of the spa with a variety of luxurious details for relaxation. Each room has a wellness space with an area to roll out a yoga mat and in-room guided mediation. The rooms will have a natural mattress and organic cotton or linen bedding with hypoallergenic bedding. Air will be filtered, dehumidified and conditioned to provide optimum air quality for good sleep. To aid deep sleep, the acoustics have been designed to minimise sound pollution. In addition to having blackout curtains and blinds, to maximise sleep, the design includes Circadian lighting set to harmonise the rhythm of internal body clock with dawn simulation, cool blue light to energise in the morning and warm soft light in the evening. We have also designed the bathroom to have a spa feel with soft lighting, restful soundscapes or guided meditations and natural scent infusions.

Delivering the wellness experience – the spa, dining and retail

We tailored the spa journey to support physical and mental wellbeing, with an infinity pool with expansive views. The concept suggests sleep enhancement therapies for deep relaxation, supported by in-room meditation and wellness provision. Other recommended treatments are aromatherapy, massage and sound therapy. The hotel and spa also proposes offering personal fitness training sessions along with a healthy diet for the stay.

The restaurant will serve food with a light touch, sympathetic cooking style to maximise the flavour, nutritional and health benefits of the customer. Additionally, the proposal is for a healthy room service menu with location specific organic meals available, fitness dishes and smoothies and for the provision of refillable water bottles and an in-room filtered water tap.

The concept for the retail spaces focus on sustainability, wellbeing and health with books and art featuring alongside spa products and decorative accessories from the area.

Connecting with nature has been a key part in the planning of all areas to create an uplifting sense of natural calm throughout the resort. This includes incorporating materials, colours and textures from the local environment to support aesthetic and mental wellbeing. The development uses Biophilic design and has natural elements woven throughout the grounds and interiors. There is a healing garden and spaces in the landscape created for mindfulness and quiet spaces to reflect, sunrise and sunset yoga on the grass overlooking the ocean as well as an area for storytelling, cultural performances and stargazing.

The environment surrounding the hotel will be equipped with air quality, temperature and humidity sensors. The app is able to show how the air quality around the hotel varies through a map and AR interface. Trees and surrounding foliage have LED sensors that visually indicate the air quality and ‘happiness’ of the plants.

The interiors focus on wellness

The concept for the lobby is of a clear uncluttered space that capitalises on the awesome roof light. This space will feature simple comfortable sofas in informal seating configurations and sympathetic lighting schemes. We have designed the rooms and suites to have the feel of the spa with a variety of luxurious details for relaxation. Each room has a wellness space with an area to roll out a yoga mat and in-room guided mediation. The rooms will have a natural mattress and organic cotton or linen bedding with hypoallergenic bedding. Air will be filtered, dehumidified and conditioned to provide optimum air quality for good sleep. To aid deep sleep, the acoustics have been designed to minimise sound pollution. In addition to having blackout curtains and blinds, to maximise sleep, the design includes Circadian lighting set to harmonise the rhythm of internal body clock with dawn simulation, cool blue light to energise in the morning and warm soft light in the evening. We have also designed the bathroom to have a spa feel with soft lighting, restful soundscapes or guided meditations and natural scent infusions.

Delivering the wellness experience – the spa, dining and retail

We tailored the spa journey to support physical and mental wellbeing, with an infinity pool with expansive views. The concept suggests sleep enhancement therapies for deep relaxation, supported by in-room meditation and wellness provision. Other recommended treatments are aromatherapy, massage and sound therapy. The hotel and spa also proposes offering personal fitness training sessions along with a healthy diet for the stay.

The restaurant will serve food with a light touch, sympathetic cooking style to maximise the flavour, nutritional and health benefits of the customer. Additionally, the proposal is for a healthy room service menu with location specific organic meals available, fitness dishes and smoothies and for the provision of refillable water bottles and an in-room filtered water tap.

The concept for the retail spaces focus on sustainability, wellbeing and health with books and art featuring alongside spa products and decorative accessories from the area.

Heta Contact

James Sandwith

Heta Contact

We use cookies to give you the best experience of using this website. By continuing to use this site, you accept our use of cookies. Please read our Cookie Policy for more information.